Javascript / AJAX

Book review: Beginning Ajax with PHP by Lee Babin

Book Review
Apress: Beginning Ajax with PHP by Lee Babin

Book Site | Sample Chapter: 3 PHP and Ajax | Table of Contents

Although no stranger to Ajax, I received a review copy of Beginning Ajax with PHP expecting some watered down presentation of Javascript with some PHP thrown in. I was quite surprised to find a good presentation of using Ajax and PHP, easy enough for the beginner and still interesting for those who have done it for years.

The book starts out exactly how I would write it -- SIMPLE! The first time I did Ajax with XHR (xml http request), I used a plain text file, which I then read into a DIV at the click of a link. This takes a similar approach and has data stored in an array which is then accessed with a simple call to a PHP file. The following chapter, takes it a step further and this building upon previous chapters is a common theme in the book.

Web 2.0 - A Second Chance To Make The Same UI Mistakes

Get ready kids. It's time to play the newest game in town; "Guess What This Control Will Do". Today's action packed game includes all sorts of links, drop-down lists, buttons and icons that don't do at all what you expect. Today's article is going to attempt to help (former) HTML jockey's understand the UI concepts that rich interface designers have been using for the last decade. There are simply too many UI mistakes being introduced into today's Web 2.0 applications.

The Future of Rich Internet Applications

Can't Get Enough Ajax writes "While Ajax continues to get most of the attention these days in the space of rich Internet apps, the future 'face' of Web applications may consist of a combination of Ajax and plug-in technologies based on the new Flash development platforms or other plug-in models. Why? The challenges of building and maintaining sophisticated software in Javascript and the lack of support for audio and video are just two reasons that any RIA strategy will involve a mixture of Ajax and one or more technologies like Flex, Laszlo, or others. But while there are significant advantages to the new RIA technologies, there are also important trade-offs including breaking the model of the Web, lack of HTML support, and more. ZDNet's Dion Hinchcliffe has a round-up of the latest generation of RIA technologies, pros and cons of each, and why there is likely a 'war' brewing among them."

Ajax Back, Forward, Reload and PHP

IdaAshley writes "A major challenge of Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (Ajax)-driven Web sites is the lack of a Back button. Mike Brittain discusses ways to get around this obstacle in part 1 of the 'Developing PHP the Ajax way' series." From the article: "The Web is a page-by-page medium. The backward and forward buttons on your browser's toolbar direct the browser from page to page. When Macromedia's Flash became all of the rage, developers and users started to see how Rich Internet Applications (RIAs) break this metaphor. You might click around a few sites, land on a Flash-based Web site, then click around in it for a few minutes. One click of the Back button and the ride is over. Rather than going one step backward within the Flash site, you completely lose your place."

First Look: Google Web Toolkit

Portions of this entry were first published in the SitePoint Tech Times #139.

Have you written your own AJAX framework yet? It seems all the big boys are doing it. Microsoft is bringing us Atlas for ASP.NET, Yahoo!’s User Interface Library is open source, server agnostic and beautifully documented and Adobe is working on Spry, which is off to a shaky start in the web standards department. Do we really need another?

Google’s late-but-inevitable entry into this arena is certainly no copycat. The Google Web Toolkit (GWT) is nothing less than a completely original approach to web development that allows server-side Java developers to take their skills to the JavaScript domain… without having to write any JavaScript.

Live Clipboard, or not…

I set aside my Codesnipers time this week to continue last week’s exploration of the Live Clipboard technical introduction. Then I found this link on Bob’s blog, and that kind of threw me off track:-

Live Clipboard Specification v0.91

I know it wouldn’t be smart to press on regardless, pretending that there was no new information, so I need to do some reading. In a normal week, that wouldn’t hold me back; I’d read the new information, adapting the article if necessary, or I’d pick something else to write about. I decided that this week would be different, for a couple of reasons.

Using Live Clipboard, part 1

Last week, I was talking about Live Clipboard, and how it was well worth investigating. Now I’m taking a closer look at the technical introduction, to see how it works, and find out how easy it is to add to a page.

Live Clipboard

This week, Microsoft’s Ray Ozzie presented his Live Clipboard concept at eTech. I saw links to the announcement everywhere I looked for a day or so. At first, I wondered what all the fuss was about, and if the muted reaction on the BoS forum is anything to go by, I might not have been the only one.

I should have been paying more attention; this is very cool.

Sharing my cool toys

I was berated the other day by Keith. He told me about PLEAC and I said yeah, I know!! He said no fair you didn't share your cool toys! So for all you remaining coders out there, I'm sharing! Here's a few handy code snippet sites and I'll review for you today.

PLEAC
This site uses the Perl Cookbook as the basis (which has the Perl source freely available) and volunteers rewrite the snippets in other languages where possible. Very handy, if you know one language and wonder how you would do it in another language.